About

Overview


Picture of Steve Wozniak and Charles Mann
Steve Wozniak and Charles Mann
After recording Powersharing Program #133
The Computer Museum in Boston – 1986

Development economist Charles Mann created The Powersharing Series as a curated, edited, high quality collection of 134 recorded presentations about personal computing. Recorded professionally between 1981 and 1991 at the Boston Computer Society, the Computer Museum, and New York computer user group meetings, speakers include computer pioneers telling their stories, industry leaders looking ahead, creators of hardware and software introducing their creations. All programs include the Q and A sessions.

Editor Mann provides narration as needed to provide context, descriptions of graphics, and occasionally, unexpected bursts of laughter. A companion Resource Guide provides information about each presentation and also some observations on their educational uses. The flash drive includes the .pdf file of the Guide plus five tables of contents: all programs sorted by number, speaker, topic, date, venue.

New Digital Edition


By 1991, programs 101 – 190 of the Series had been produced on audiocassettes. In 1991, Mann was posted to The Gambia, West Africa. He put into long-term storage all the Powersharing tapes and studio equipment including the source tapes for the production backlog of 44 programs. Returning to work on the Series in 2013, he began a collaboration with the Computer History Museum to produce digitally the entire Series, including producing the backlogged 44 programs. Assisted by volunteer Associate Editor Tom Frikker and graphics designer Bill Shea, in 2019 Mann completed this digitally remastered, complete flash drive edition of the Series. In addition to the 134 audio programs, the flash drive edition includes 13 videos: Powersharing’s 1982 video Introduction to the Microcomputer; several shorts, and video versions of ten of the audio programs. Also included is a 23 program mini-series of presentations recorded at the Electronic Networking Association Conferences of 1988 and 1989, around the time of the first commercial uses of the Internet.

Overview


Picture of Steve Wozniak and Charles Mann
Steve Wozniak and Charles Mann
After recording Powersharing Program #133
The Computer Museum in Boston – 1986

Development economist Charles Mann created The Powersharing Series as a curated, edited, high quality collection of 134 recorded presentations about personal computing. Recorded professionally between 1981 and 1991 at the Boston Computer Society, the Computer Museum, and New York computer user group meetings, speakers include computer pioneers telling their stories, industry leaders looking ahead, creators of hardware and software introducing their creations. All programs include the Q and A sessions.

Editor Mann provides narration as needed to provide context, descriptions of graphics, and occasionally, unexpected bursts of laughter. A companion Resource Guide provides information about each presentation and also some observations on their educational uses. The flash drive includes the .pdf file of the Guide plus five tables of contents: all programs sorted by number, speaker, topic, date, venue.

New Digital Edition


By 1991, programs 101 – 190 of the Series had been produced on audiocassettes. In 1991, Mann was posted to The Gambia, West Africa. He put into long-term storage all the Powersharing tapes and studio equipment including the source tapes for the production backlog of 44 programs. Returning to work on the Series in 2013, he began a collaboration with the Computer History Museum to produce digitally the entire Series, including producing the backlogged 44 programs. Assisted by volunteer Associate Editor Tom Frikker and graphics designer Bill Shea, in 2019 Mann completed this digitally remastered, complete flash drive edition of the Series. In addition to the 134 audio programs, the flash drive edition includes 13 videos: Powersharing’s 1982 video Introduction to the Microcomputer; several shorts, and video versions of ten of the audio programs. Also included is a 23 program mini-series of presentations recorded at the Electronic Networking Association Conferences of 1988 and 1989, around the time of the first commercial uses of the Internet.